JONATHAN KIM, MArch

Architectural Robotic Morphology



The persistence of mass production inherited by the 20th century has evolved to prioritize manufacturing of products over prototyping, resulting in complacency within the design process. The emerging use of the robotic arm reveals an opportunity to investigate the change in morphology through the form and robotic milling process. The versatility of the robotic arm narrows the distance between fabrication and digital design, to invite a cyclical design process that can proactively respond to the errors of fabrication. Early uses of robotics have been introduced in construction through a simplified and repetitive fashion, where efficiency is the priority.

With the substantial adoption of robotics on the horizon, a shift in paradigm can be realized by investigating the physical and digital spaces through human-machine integration. The investigation synthesizes the transition between digital and physical spaces to form a dialogue between the designer and the robotic arm, prioritizing proactive regeneration in response to failures in fabrication. The integration of the robotic arm through prototyping rather than producing can inscribe a growth in collaborative intelligence within digital media and halt the cyclical nature of overindulgent complacency inherited by the Industrial Age.


The versatility of the robotic arm narrows the distance between fabrication and digital design, to invite a cyclical design process that can proactively respond to the errors of fabrication.




 

Ryerson Department of  Architectural Science Toronto, CA.