Current Exhibition:
Year End Show
2020



For our inaugural online exhibition, the Ryerson Department of Architectural Science is showcasing our 2020 Year End Show, featuring our best student work. At DAS, we encourage students to test boundaries, explore new possibilities, and apply their skill to prevailing issues present within their evolving surroundings. This annual exhibition presents the culmination of the 2019-2020 academic term, showcasing the impressive and cutting-edge works of our top students in all four years of study and at the graduate level.



ONLINE CATALOGUE
YEAR 1
        Communications Studio: ASC 101
        City Stories: ASC 201
YEAR 2
        Design Studio II: ASC 301
        Design Studio III: ASC 401
YEAR 3
        Integration Studio I: ASC 520
        Integration Studio II: ASC 620
YEAR 4


        Architecture Studio: ARC 720
        Architecture Studio: ARC 820

        Building Science Studio I: BSC 720
        Building Science Studio II: BSC 820


MArch
        Studio in Critical Practice: AR8101
        Seminar in Critical Practice: AR8102
        Studio in Collaborative Practice: AR8103
MBSc & MASc

        Building Design Seminar/Studio: BL8104





Each section of ASC 201 has been allocated a wandering line in the city of Toronto. Students were asked to carry out four tasks in relation to that line for this first project of the winter semester:

  • Walk the line. Spend a few hours in the cold January weather walking the line. Follow the line from beginning to end and then back again. Go with a friend, go back alone. Talk to people. Get a coffee. Document what you find in photographs, sketches, notes, sound recordings.

  • Make an object. Make an assemblage from objects you have collected on your walk. Everything in the assemblage (except glue) must be found on the line. Objects can be purchased, scavenged, found. The assemblage you make should tell us something about the line and should be no larger than 200mmx300mmx300mm high. All objects used in the assemblage should be documented in their original location on the line using photography.

  • Write a story. Write a story about the line. Like all good stories, it should focus on one or more characters you encounter on your walks, and the story should tell us something important you have discovered. The story should take no more than five minutes to tell.

  • Draw it. Using the conventions of architectural drawing, - plan, section, elevation and so on - prepare a single drawing of your assemblage as an occupied structure. In order to do this you will need to consider (among other things) the following: Where is the assemblage to be situated? It should be somewhere along your line. What is the scale of the assemblage? In other words, how big is it? How will people use the structure? What will they do in, on and around it? What needs to be added, beyond the assemblage you have built, in order to allow this occupation?


JUSTIN LIEBERMAN
Connection: A Storytelling Headquarters



“Always design a thing by considering it in its next larger context - a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan.”
– Eliel Saarinen

This design is a connection. it connects the context to the infinite. from how people move from one space to the next. This proposes a balance through making and breaking connections. Architecture is a connection.

This is a connection.



The storytelling headquarters is located on the corner of Queen St. East and McFarrens Lane. The form of the cafe is primarily focused on the surrounded Victorian fronts and old chimney. Inspiration was taken from the surroundings, but as you go through the pavilions of the site, the forms start to take you to a new and different space all together. A transfer from brick to cement occurs while you descend further through the headquarters.