Current Exhibition:
New Faculty in Practice



New faculty members William Galloway and Carlo Parente are exhibiting their recent projects, entitled Tokyo Stories and Projects via a 360 virtual tour.

The introduction of new faculty members to any academic program is always an exciting occasion, a moment of rejuvenation, a turning in the orientation of the programs (even if subtle), and an indication of a previously unseen future.



To view our inaugural online exhibition, the 2020 Year End Show, click here.




“Facility and Farm Haus represent my ongoing interest in embracing oppositional forces, – such as old versus new, rural versus urban, public versus private.” — Carlo Parente
WILLIAM GALLOWAY AND CARLO PARENTE
New Faculty in Practice
Download the exhibition catalogue here.   

The introduction of new faculty members to any academic program is always an exciting occasion, a moment of rejuvenation, a turning in the orientation of the programs (even if subtle), and an indication of a previously unseen future.

New Faculty in Practice is intended to provide a glimpse for the broad community of Architectural Science at Ryerson University of the new future we have set in motion by welcoming two new faculty members to our Department. Carlo Parente and Will Galloway both bring extensive experience to Ryerson, both as educators and as architects. Parente, an alumnus of the Ryerson BArchSc program, has returned to Toronto after spending most of his career to date in Chicago, teaching at IIT and developing a practice based on a concern for the materiality of architecture and the impact of construction practices on the built world. Galloway, a Canadian who trained at the University of Manitoba and completed his PhD at the University of Tokyo, has come back to Canada after teaching and practicing for 15 years in Tokyo. Galloway's practice, frontoffice tokyo, has been strongly inflected by an interest in the unique urban condition of Tokyo.

Although the two sides of the gallery in this exhibition will present differing approaches to architecture, the resonances between the two bodies of work are particularly interesting. After all, Parente's work is also inflected by the urban condition, and Galloway's by a deep consideration of material practices. It is my hope that a conversation will develop between the two, a conversation that will help us to see where we are going as a Department, where we see the future for architectural education.

— Colin Ripley, Curator of Paul H. Cocker Gallery




“The city is growing in different ways, becoming more comfortable, more interesting, more varied. All of these things are possible because of the way the city is allowed to change, and that is what we, in our role as foreign observers of Tokyo, see as the lesson for the rest of the world, at least for this moment in time.” — William Galloway
Ryerson Department of  Architectural Science Toronto, CA.