YEKATERINA KOROTAYEVA, MArch

Bodies in Architecture



Throughout the history of Western architecture, the human body has been understood as a complete and singular thing. The collection of rules, texts, and theories that today we inherit as the system of architecture has been developed by mining ideal bodies for formal principles. This work is an attempt at engaging with the ongoing processes of redesign of our bodies and moving away from principles of biological determinism. Through the study of four imaginary and partial bodies this work re-frames the conception of a body as a multiplicity. The imaginary bodies, derived from the study of emerging surveillance technologies, social media, sexual desires, and neurological disorders, become the focus of the speculative design project of a home. As an assemblage of environments that only address imaginary dimensions of human condition, this thesis aims to relate to the emerging ways of being human that are often dismissed by established architectural regimes.














The imaginary bodies, derived from the study of emerging surveillance technologies, social media, sexual desires, and neurological disorders, become the focus of the speculative design project of a home.





Ryerson Department of  Architectural Science Toronto, CA.